Stern Still Loves Cox!

Even though Howard is no longer working for Cox Broadcasting's WCKG in Chicago, that doesn't mean he still doesn't love Cox. According to on-air statements made by Howard, he's still working with Cox because they own the company that is making his book "Private Parts" into a movie. This fact might just be a major reason why Howard's split with WCKG was done "amicably" and that Howard and Cox arrived at a settlement to pay off the rest of his contract."We respect Howard's need to be Howard", Mike Disney VP/GM of WCKG said of the split. Howard's agent, Don Buchwald told the Chicago Sun-Times' Robert Feder, "I'm sorry it didn't work out better for WCKG than it did, but I don't hold any terrific grudges against them. We certainly want to make Chicago a win situation for us".

Background Information

Week Of 10/2 - Reprinted From The Chicago Sun-Times
Story by Robert Feder

In the latest jolt to America's most famous "shock jock" Howard Stern has been fired from a Chicago radio station for the second time in two years. WCKG-FM (105.9) which has carried Stern's New York-based syndicated morning show since last March cited unspecified problems with "on-air content" for pulling the plug, effective immediately. His last show aired Friday. Stern, 41, previously aired in Chicago on the former WLUP-AM -- now known as WMVP-AM (1000) for 10 months before he was fired in August 1993. "Over the past couple of months, we here at WCKG have become philosophically uncomfortable with some of Howard's on-air content," said vice-president Mike Disney, vice president and general manager of WCKG.

Stern also had targeted another Evergreen employee, WRCX-FM (103.5) morning man, Mancow Muller, with whom he had a bitterly personal feud. On the day Muller attended his father's funeral, Stern delivered a long on-air tirade about defiling the corpse. For Muller, Stern's cancellation may bring more than mere vindication. It likely will elevate the 28-year-old to nationwide status as a radio giant-killer for running Stern out of the No. 3 market after only six months. "This may be the happiest day of my life," Muller said Sunday, claiming to be popping champagne. "Howard Stern didn't know what he was getting himself into here. I really think he was shocked that I fought back."

WCKG MAY NOT HAVE GOTTEN
LAST WORDS FROM STERN

By Judy Hevrdejs and Mike Conklin. - Chicago Tribune.

Shock jock Howard Stern and G. Gordon Liddy on the same Chicago station-WJJD-AM? That's the speculation after WCKG-FM general manager Mike Disney, who said he "felt uncomfortable" with Stern's often-inflammatory material, pulled the plug Friday on the controversial, New York-based talker after a six-month run.

This is the second time in two years Stern has been dropped in Chicago; WLUP's Larry Wert-subject of subsequent Stern tirades on WCKG-did it in August '93 for similar reasons. But with ratings "quite excellent" this time, insiders speculate the show will get picked up quicker, and an Infinity Broadcasting station, which owns all-talk WJJD-AM, is the likely spot due to its Stern syndication ties.

SUMMATION: Stern Show Pit-Stop

Stern fans and detractors should realize that Howard's switch over to WJJD 1160am was simply a PIT-STOP in the race to win in Chicago. Howard's swift move to Infinity's talk outlet is proof that Howard's show does work in Chicago, if you've got the balls to air it. All parties involved agreed that the split was "amicable" and that Howard's ratings were on the rise. Unlike Evergreen's WLUPam, WCKG did settle with Howard on the remainder of his contract.

"There's 37 guys doing my act in Chicago and you're asking me to tone it down. I got a guy sending me boxes of doodie in the mail. What do the think I'm going to do, sit back and take that!", Howard said of WCKG and Mancoward. Mancow and his fans may have felt a victory for 30 seconds, but I'm sure when they heard Howard was back on in Chicago, there was a rush to their colons like a bad case of diarrhea.

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1995 The K.O.A.M. Newsletter. All Rights Reserved.
Articles Courtesy of: Chicago Sun-Times & Chicago Tribune.